How to choose a company that suits you in terms of values?
The success of a company depends on how strong people it hires and whether it invests in building a strong culture; & nbsp;people's happiness depends on the cultures in which they work. & nbsp;After hiring, I decided to create my own company that would influence these two & nbsp; things. At A-Players Recruiting, we now […]

The success of a company depends on how strong people it hires and whether it invests in building a strong culture; & nbsp;
people's happiness depends on the cultures in which they work. & nbsp;
After hiring, I decided to create my own company that would influence these two & nbsp; things. At A-Players Recruiting, we now hire top performers for idea startups from Silicon Valley and Ukraine and help them build strong cultures. & Nbsp;
And now I want to share with you tips that will help you at the stage of employment to determine whether the culture of a potential employer suits you and whether you share its values.

Try to get an impression of the company's culture before the interview Many companies describe their culture, for example, on their own website. Look for press releases and analyze what news the company publishes about itself. For example, companies that write mostly about investments and inclusion in ratings on their social media pages are more likely to develop a culture of achievement / numbers / profits and are likely to see less value in a person and his or her personality. And for companies that are more likely to publish news about product features, integration with partners and user history, there is usually a culture of creativity, innovation and focus on the person and his individuality. & Nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; in which the company invests its resources;
what is the mission of the company, for what purpose it was created;
why the person you are communicating with works in this company;
for which this company fires or, on the contrary, raises people (this question allows you to better understand the true values ​​of the company, rather than those that sound good).
Be sure to share your vision of the company's culture with the company representative and ask for feedback. & Nbsp; Try to get to know the whole team & nbsp; If this is not the case during the interview process, ask for an appointment. Meet the team informally (in a cafe, on a walk, during any activity). I really believe in a kind of "" "" dating "" "" before accepting an offer. After all, accepting an offer of cooperation, you decide to spend most of your time with these people in a certain period of life. & Nbsp; Talk to company executives More and more companies are now interviewing the founder as one of the stages of employment. But even if it is not provided, ask you to meet (of course, if the size of the company provides). Because the best culture and values ​​of a company can be understood only by getting acquainted with its first persons. At the meeting, ask the founder the only question: why he is doing this and why he created the company. & Nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; Remember that cultures in other countries can vary greatly. People there watched other cartoons as children, laughed at other jokes, played other games, ate other food, spoke another language and most importantly - grew up in a country with a different history. & Nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp;
Try to learn the language of your colleagues at least at a basic level. Through certain constructions, phrases and idioms it is possible to better understand the peculiarities of culture. For example, the Ukrainian team Talkable (a startup from San Francisco where I was in charge of talent and culture) once took English lessons, and the American team took Russian lessons with native speakers (then the vast majority of people in the Ukrainian team still spoke Russian). If your colleagues' language is English, invest in fluency in this universal and extremely useful language. & Nbsp; & nbsp;
Spend enough time with colleagues from other cultures. If possible, meet in person. If not - communicate at least online and, importantly - not only on professional topics. In the same Talkable regularly invited the Ukrainian team to San Francisco, and the American - to Kiev. The impact of these visits on the company's performance and sense of team unity was enormous. & Nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp;
Constantly study the features of other cultures. Read the news of the countries where your colleagues come from. Consume materials from their information field at least at a basic level.
As an express method, I recommend reading the book.

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